As the capital of the region of Andalucía, Sevilla is a city with a strong historical past that is still present in the lifestyle today. While Madrid and Barcelona have that "big city" feel, Sevilla maintains its historic charm and old way of life mentality, despite being the fourth largest city in Spain. Having spent three months living in Sevilla, I quickly fell in love with the city and managed to see just about every historical monument or location that there is to see. 

To begin, Sevilla is split into two main "districts", Triana and Centro, with the río Guadalquivir separating the two. The difference between Centro and Triana is the difference between Manhattan and Brooklyn, New York, if you will. They're both the same city yet they each have their own unique identities and pride. Also, if you're confused about seeing "Andalusia" and "Andalucía" spelled differently in different places, that's just because one is the English and one is the Spanish version! 

Centro is where you will find many of the historical tourist attractions: La Catedral de Sevilla, Alcázar de Sevilla, Plaza de España, El Metropol Parasol or las setas, Plaza de Toros (bullfight stadium), the Sevilla FC stadium (local soccer team) and much more. Centro is also filled with shops, both local and stores that you'll probably recognize, such as H&M, Zara, Sephora, etc. Calle Betis is the main street that houses the majority of the fashion and lifestyle stores but you'll find some scattered elsewhere as well. 






On the hunt for the perfect tapas bar? You'll find one just about every other door in centro, and you really can't go wrong with any of them. The ideology behind tapas is much more than simply just snacking on little plates of food among your friends, it's an evening affair that is meant to move at a slow pace as a way of socializing with you friends, family or strangers. It's common to hop from 2-5 different tapas bars in an evening, order a drink and 1-2 tapas before moving onto the next bar, possibly adding to your party as you go. Here is a great article by the Travel Channel discussing "tapas etiquette" and a little Spanish to English guide on the types of tapas you'll most commonly find in Sevilla.   




On the Triana side, you'll find that it's much more old-school Spain. People's walking pace becomes slower, the siestas become longer, the markets contain more "exotic" goods and the architecture has its own unique style. The Mercado de Triana is a huge outdoor/underground (contradicting, I know) market that is full of different vendors ranging from traditional jamón ibérico to fresh fruits and delicious (really delicious) traditional Spanish baked goods. 

Triana is also a great place to find excellent tapas bars, especially along the river where you can have a meal with a view. If you're interested in purchasing beautiful ceramics, Triana is the place to do it. There are loads of ceramic shops with hand-painted pottery and there's even a museum dedicated to it. I wish I had more photos to display the beautiful pottery, but just imagine that it's really colorful and intricately painted!


They say that Sevilla "tiene un color especial" or it "has a special color" and you'll really find that to be true. There is something very special about Sevilla that is difficult to pinpoint unless you've experienced it for yourself. Sevilla is an especially important city for me and I believe you'll fall in love with it too after even the quickest of visits. 

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Understanding the Lifestyle of Sevilla, Spain

As the capital of the region of Andalucía, Sevilla is a city with a strong historical past that is still present in the lifestyle today. While Madrid and Barcelona have that "big city" feel, Sevilla maintains its historic charm and old way of life mentality, despite being the fourth largest city in Spain. Having spent three months living in Sevilla, I quickly fell in love with the city and managed to see just about every historical monument or location that there is to see. 

To begin, Sevilla is split into two main "districts", Triana and Centro, with the río Guadalquivir separating the two. The difference between Centro and Triana is the difference between Manhattan and Brooklyn, New York, if you will. They're both the same city yet they each have their own unique identities and pride. Also, if you're confused about seeing "Andalusia" and "Andalucía" spelled differently in different places, that's just because one is the English and one is the Spanish version! 

Centro is where you will find many of the historical tourist attractions: La Catedral de Sevilla, Alcázar de Sevilla, Plaza de España, El Metropol Parasol or las setas, Plaza de Toros (bullfight stadium), the Sevilla FC stadium (local soccer team) and much more. Centro is also filled with shops, both local and stores that you'll probably recognize, such as H&M, Zara, Sephora, etc. Calle Betis is the main street that houses the majority of the fashion and lifestyle stores but you'll find some scattered elsewhere as well. 






On the hunt for the perfect tapas bar? You'll find one just about every other door in centro, and you really can't go wrong with any of them. The ideology behind tapas is much more than simply just snacking on little plates of food among your friends, it's an evening affair that is meant to move at a slow pace as a way of socializing with you friends, family or strangers. It's common to hop from 2-5 different tapas bars in an evening, order a drink and 1-2 tapas before moving onto the next bar, possibly adding to your party as you go. Here is a great article by the Travel Channel discussing "tapas etiquette" and a little Spanish to English guide on the types of tapas you'll most commonly find in Sevilla.   




On the Triana side, you'll find that it's much more old-school Spain. People's walking pace becomes slower, the siestas become longer, the markets contain more "exotic" goods and the architecture has its own unique style. The Mercado de Triana is a huge outdoor/underground (contradicting, I know) market that is full of different vendors ranging from traditional jamón ibérico to fresh fruits and delicious (really delicious) traditional Spanish baked goods. 

Triana is also a great place to find excellent tapas bars, especially along the river where you can have a meal with a view. If you're interested in purchasing beautiful ceramics, Triana is the place to do it. There are loads of ceramic shops with hand-painted pottery and there's even a museum dedicated to it. I wish I had more photos to display the beautiful pottery, but just imagine that it's really colorful and intricately painted!


They say that Sevilla "tiene un color especial" or it "has a special color" and you'll really find that to be true. There is something very special about Sevilla that is difficult to pinpoint unless you've experienced it for yourself. Sevilla is an especially important city for me and I believe you'll fall in love with it too after even the quickest of visits. 
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